July to September

 

 


July As the bee colony reaches its full strength the foraging worker bees go forth to reap the summers rich bounty. Lime trees literally “drip” nectar on humid days yielding a “minty” flavoured honey. Blackberry, clover and willow herb add to the subtle flavour of our English Summer Honey. Other plants, that are considered weeds, such as Poppy, Hogweed and Thistle all contribute to the summer crop.

In some regions Borage is grown for its valuable seed. The brilliant blue flowers are highly attractive to bees producing a very pale honey. The pollination services provided by our bees increase the yield of the crop.

 

 

 



August The last remnants of summer flowers wilt as the harvest begins. There is little now for the bees to find. In moorland and heath areas the Heather begins to bloom. The dense purple carpet of flowers can yield a rich source of nectar and pollen which, when conditions prevail, yields a unique strong flavoured honey.

 

 

 



September The autumn draws closer and very few native wild flowers remain. In some parts of the country along river banks and wetlands an invader, Himalayan Balsam, has proved to be a valuable addition to the honey bees menu. It was introduced to this country and is considered a pest. But it yields pollen and nectar at a time of year when food is scarce.

 

Jul-Sept Flower Photos

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Blackberry

Blackberry

Clover

Clover

Willowherb

Willowherb

Poppy

Poppy

Thistle

Thistle

Borage

Borage

Hogweed

Hogweed

Heather

Heather

Balsam

Balsam