January to March

 


 

January In the depths of a cold dark winter there are no flowers for our bees to visit. They must stay within the safety and warmth of their hive waiting for the lengthening hours of daylight to stir the plants into life bringing forth the flowers on which they depend.


February In a mild winter the Hazel catkins may open early releasing fine clouds of pollen into the wind. On a still sunny day the bees will try to collect some of this early food but usually conditions are too cold and wet for the bees to venture from the safety of their hives.

As the days slowly lengthen Snowdrops and Crocus flowers push up from the cold soil. Where these flowers are found in sunny sheltered positions the bees may gather some early pollen but must quickly return to the warmth of the hive.


March The first signs of spring bring the “Pussy” Willow into bloom. The fluffy yellow male catkins produce copious amounts of pollen. This is a very important early source of pollen for the bees. The foraging workers return with their pollen baskets laden with this precious cargo. If mild conditions prevail the bee colony can thrive on this early bounty.

 

Jan-Mar Flower Photos

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Hazel Catkins

Hazel Catkins

 

Crocus

Crocus

 

Pussy Willow

Pussy Willow